The Prague Cemetery

Rating
(2 )

The nineteenth century teemed with mysterious and horrible events: the Protocols of the Elders of Zion, the notorious forgery that later inspired Hitler; the Dreyfus Case; and numerous intrigues involving the secret services of various nations, Masonic sects, Jesuit conspiracies, as well as other episodes that—were they not documented truths—would be difficult to believe.

The Prague Cemetery is a story in which all the characters except one—the main character—really existed. Even the hero's grandfather, the author of a mysterious actual letter that triggered modern anti- Semitism, is historical.

And the hero himself, though fictional, is a personage who resembles many people we have all known, past and present. In the book, he serves as the author of diverse fabrications and plots against a backdrop of extraordinary coups de théâtre: sewers filled with corpses, ships that explode in the region of an erupting volcano, abbots stabbed to death, notaries with fake beards, hysterical female Satanists, the celebrants of black Masses, and so on.

I am expecting two kinds of readers. The first has no idea that all these things really happened, knows nothing about nineteenth-century literature, and might even have taken Dan Brown seriously. He or she should gain a certain sadistic satisfaction from what will seem a perverse invention—including the main character, whom I have tried to make the most cynical and disagreeable in all the history of literature.

The second, however, knows or senses that I am recounting things that really happened. The fact that history can be quite so devious may cause this reader's brow to become lightly beaded with sweat. He will look anxiously behind him, switch on all the lights, and suspect that these things could happen again today. In fact, they may be happening in that very moment. And he will think, as I do: "They are among us..."

--Umberto Eco

 

Product Details

TOP RATED BOOKS

The Iliad

One of the foremost achievements in Western literature, Homer's Iliad tells the story of the darkest episode of the Troj...

Atlas of Gastroenterology

Accurate, high-quality images are especially vital for gastrointestinal therapy. The Atlas of Gastroenterology is a gol...

War and Peace

Widely considered the greatest novel ever written in any language, War and Peace has as its backdrop Napoleon's invasion...

The trial and death of Socrates

The trial of Socrates refers to the trial and the subsequent execution of the Athenian philosopher Socrates in 399 BC. S...

The History of the Peloponnesian War

Thucydides, an Athenian, wrote the history of the war between the Peloponnesians and the Athenians; he began at the mome...

MOST POPULAR BOOKS

Wastewater Engineering: Treatment and Reuse, 4th edition (Metcalf …

Wastewater Engineering: Treatment and Reuse, 4/e is a thorough update of McGraw-Hill's authoritative book on wastewater ...

The Lord of the Rings

The Lord of the Rings is the third best-selling novel ever written, with over 150 million copies sold, while the fourth ...

The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable

A black swan is a highly improbable event with three principal characteristics: It is unpredictable; it carries a massiv...

Engineering and Technology in Ancient Greece

The ancient Greeks had made a remarkable advancement, in the field of Engineering and Technology. Their achievements, fr...

The Big One

It is the summer of 1947 and Europe is being torn apart by a war nobody can win. Nazi Germany occupies everything from t...